Getting a raise is more than simply asking your boss for one. If this were all there was to it, it wouldn’t be so fraught with potential peril. Here are some suggestions to help you get a raise, even in these sketchy financial times:

Do not say you “need” a raise

Quite frankly, your boss is not interested in what you may personally need when it comes to money. Just because you have mortgage payments or credit card debt does not mean you deserve a raise. Instead, you will get a raise because of your abilities and accomplishments, and not because of your personal issues. Don’t ever forget that.

Take on the worst project at work – and succeed at it

One way to show your work is to succeed at a really miserable task or project. Perhaps it is with a difficult client, or a complicated task. So take on the job nobody else wants, do well at it, and you can put your career in a whole new light.

Keep your boss regularly informed as to your achievements

It doesn’t have to be anything fancy – just regular status update emails, letting him or her know what you have achieved. Focus on what you have accomplished each week, or every other week. Just don’t send the emails too often, or you could potentially come across as annoying.

Be aware of the going rate for your job

If you can show facts and figures showing what the market rate is for your job title, you stand a much better chance of getting a raise than just going in blind. This can also keep you from overselling – or underselling – yourself.

Pay attention to your company’s performance evaluation system

If your firm does annual reviews, be aware of what you will be graded on, and be sure to succeed at each task. Basically, you need to do what your boss thinks is important, not what you think is important. All too many employees fail to understand that distinction.

Have good timing

You do not want to be asking for a raise the day your company loses a huge client. Instead, ask for one after something good has happened, or at a quiet time in your company. In addition, if your boss seems harried that day, do not ask him or her then.

Get another job offer

This is a risky move, but you could potentially get more money at your current job if you have a job offer in hand from another company. However, this can be dangerous. In some cases, your employer may wish you good luck, and not match or exceed the offer. In others, you might get the raise, but your boss may view you as disloyal. So do not do this maneuver unless you are prepared to jump ship.

GUEST AUTHOR PROFILE:

Lisa Swan is a representative of the Institute for Coaching, a premiere life and executive coaching company.

3 thoughts on “7 Tips for Getting a Raise-

  • June 11, 2012 at 2:08 pm
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    Good timing is everything. Don't simply ask fora raise. Ask if you have chances to receive it in a near futureand what are you supposed to do for that

    Reply
  • June 11, 2012 at 2:27 pm
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    In general, I really liked the advice although I would never recommend getting a competing offer in order to facilitate a raise for two reasons:

    – The company will feel that they cannot trust you, and they'll likely make plans to part with you even if they temporarily give you the raise you seek.

    – Do you really want to work for an organization that will only grant you an increase in compensation when you've forced their hand?

    There may be exceptions if you operate in a very narrow or specialized field and are in very high demand, but in that case, the organization should already be aware of your worth — especially if you've been using the other techniques presented.

    -ASB: http://XeeMe.com/AndrewBaker

    Reply

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